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Month

December 2010
‘Emotional recession’ is a beautiful, yet dark and heavy phrase – but it’s not mine. It came from our research agency, HPI. It describes the state of individuals currently: After the economical recession, people are feeling battered and they’re going through their own emotional recession. We found the same when we at Jobsite were conducting...
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The core argument of football clubs (and other sports rights holders) is always about the positive impact of a sponsorship on the brand of the sponsor. Usually these conversations include TV viewing figures, the captive audience in the stadium, the number of sold shirts and recently the number of times the team that carries the...
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Foursquare seems in a bit of a bother. Just very recently a mobile network provider told me about some of the work they are doing with retailers here in the UK. If you enter a store and you are with said network, you will receive a special offer. They can triangulate the individual within a...
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The whole discussion about talent pools is completely misguided. Seriously! It’s such an outdated recruiter/hirer perspective and never ever includes the perspective of the individual candidate. Have they been asked to be in the talent pool? And by this I don’t mean, if they have given permission, but are the actively participating.  Or have they...
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In September 2004 I had the pleasure to witness a panel discussion about social and professional networks, as well as six degrees of separation, in Boston.  On the panel were Marc Pincus (then founder of Tribe.net, now founder of Zynga) and Matt Cohler (Linkedin, then Facebook, now general partner at Benchmark Capital). It was marvellous...
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You know when you’ve read a really good book: If asked about specific challenges, you not only recommend the book, but specific chapters within it. That’s precisely what I did after reading Scott Stratton’s UnMarketing: Stop Marketing. Start Engaging, not only once but several times. The book is an interesting mash up between a handbook...
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